Norfolk Wildlife

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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Wed Dec 30, 2015 12:06 pm

The great bustard was once a common inhabitant of the Norfolk Brecklands. I recently came upon a publication containing an account of how the last Norfolk drove was shot and ended up in a glass case in Norwich Castle Museum where they reside to this day. It is a quite depressing but compellingly interesting tale. You can read more at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Wed Jan 06, 2016 11:29 am

Lowland heath is a precious and declining habitat. Although only a shadow of its former glory we have a remnant area of heathland in the city of Norwich. This area, known as Mousehold Heath, is now being managed by Norwich City Council to maintain existing areas of heather and where possible extend them. Many species of birds, insects, mammals, reptiles and fungi can still be found, albeit in small numbers, and the whole area represents a green oasis totally surrounded by busy roads, housing and industry. Read more by visiting my blog at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife - RIP Starman

Postby Easternbushchat » Mon Jan 11, 2016 8:54 pm

A kind of tribute to David Bowie written a few months ago. Like many kids of my generation he had a profound effect on our lives and will be sorely missed :(

You can read the post at http://easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk/2 ... nters.html
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Thu Jan 14, 2016 5:21 pm

Is there any sound more evocative of wild winter landscapes, windswept and worn, than the piercing whistling of wigeon? It is a cheery sound but always conjures images of open spaces; coastal marshes where the calls of curlew vibrate on the still air, estuarine vastness where myriad probing beaks puncture the shining muds, or as today the lush green of valley marshland caressed by a watery January sun......

I visited the Yare Valley in Norfolk yesterday - read more about my visit at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sat Jan 16, 2016 6:26 pm

My latest blog concerning the much maligned but beautiful sparrowhawk.

'Birds of prey in general but sparrowhawks in particular can invoke strong emotion with the general public. It is not uncommon for outraged citizens to write letters to the local press savaging these essential members of the food web for decimating 'their' songbirds. The fact those very same people concrete their drives, manicure their lawns, spray insecticides liberally about their prized begonias, litter the ground with slug pellets, and keep cats is overlooked. It is this illogical scramble to keep things tidy that deprives 'their' songbirds of feeding, nesting and roosting opportunities, but that inconvenient fact seems not to enter into their consciousness....'

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sat Jan 23, 2016 8:13 pm

A brief encounter with a couple of modern day birders which left me wondering (again) what these people are all about.

'The conversation, if such a brief exchange could be termed such, went thus.
Me: ''Morning chaps, lovely day".
One of them: "Yeah, but there's nothing about"

‘Nothing about’. What exactly does that mean? I briefly entertained the notion of nudging them
gently into the river, this brace of morose humanity, or perhaps suspending them by their thumbs from the nearest willow, but elected instead to smile lamely and plod on. Birders, especially those obsessed with photographing ‘rarities’ are impossible to please. On such a fine, crisp winter’s day it was a joy to be alive; a blessing to be fit and well enough to get out and embrace the fresh air. Better surely to celebrate the fact that you still have a pulse and are occupying the right side of the grass than lament the absence of that elusive ‘something’ without which the enterprise is deemed a failure? '

Read the full post and more at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sun Jan 31, 2016 11:15 am

My latest blog post concerning my involvement with the RSPB's Big Garden Birdwatch event in Norwich Castle:

' I spent yesterday helping the RSPB with their Big Garden Birdwatch event held in the impressive setting of Norwich Castle. What a delight to be able to contribute to such a positive, uplifting occasion; to see so many enthusiastic volunteers, so many excited children with parents happy that the offspring were getting involved in something so worthwhile and positive.....'

Read more at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Thu Feb 11, 2016 11:14 am

'As I sit typing this I can look out my study window and watch a carrion crow proclaiming his rights of ownership of a tall, dense Norway spruce straddling the borders of our garden. This ex-Christmas tree was planted decades ago by our then neighbour and is now the tallest tree in the immediate vicinity. The crow is sitting on the topmost sprig straining forward to utter his croaking caw to any rival bird that may be interested. It looks like him and his partner, she who watches serenely from a nearby rooftop, plan to use the tree as a nesting site over the coming months.

This plan seems reasonable enough, if a little daunting for the other avian inhabitants of our patch, except for the irritating fact the magpies don't like it.....
'

My latest blog post anticipating trouble between the local corvids. Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Tue Mar 01, 2016 3:18 pm

I like foxes and particularly enjoy the fact they share our gardens and parks. As far as I am concerned they add much colour and vibrancy to our lives and are more than welcome to dig a den under my shed if they so choose. Not everyone agrees though.......

My latest blog in praise of urban foxes can be found at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk hope you enjoy it.
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Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sun Mar 06, 2016 11:02 am

...I could just make out a song thrush in the distance stridently puncturing the air with confident notes. It was making sure we all got his message by shouting a repertoire of fluty phrases twice or thrice as is the hallmark of the species. I fell to remembering how once in the soft, still twilight of a May evening whilst I was sitting by my pond letting the stresses of the day lift and tease away like early evening mists, a songthrush came down from its lofty singing post to pour forth its beautiful song just a few feet from where I sat. The sound was so pure and so loud that I thought for a few seconds a nightingale had miraculously made its way onto the garden list, but no, it was just a humble song thrush. I sat mesmerised by this wonderful chorister until with the gathering gloom he gave way to the night. That few minutes still ranks as one of the best wildlife experiences of my life simply because it was only me, a younger less weary me, and the bird. No other sound, no other people, just the perfect tune of a songthrush and the sweet scent of honeysuckle.....

Read more in my latest blog post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.co.uk
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