Norfolk Wildlife

Post your blogs here to be a BBC Wildlife Local Patch Reporter

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Tue Jul 05, 2016 10:16 pm

New Blog Post: Summer at Norfolk Wildlife Trust's Ranworth Broad:

'....The visual evidence of how the season is speeding by can now be seen very clearly at NWT Ranworth Broad. Here, a walk along the boardwalk will take you through lushly vegetated wetland where head high reed sways in the breeze, their ranks speckled with pastel pink valerian, purple spikes of marsh thistles, white umbels of milk parsley and yellow spires of loosestrife. In the wet swamp carr, woodbine, perfumed sweet, entwines with woody bittersweet and the Royal fern thrusts its spore laden fingers skyward. Rich summer profusion.

But it is perhaps the activity of the birds that indicates how we have moved from the frantic urgency of spring; the chasing, screeching, posturing and skirmishing, to the more focused task of fledging this year’s offspring. And the most obvious species to be encountered as you look out over the broad from our floating visitor centre are the grebes, terns and the swallows....'

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Wed Jul 13, 2016 10:01 am

New Blog - Life in the UK may not be as bad as you think it is.

'...Fed up with the current state of events? Tired of hearing about the in-fighting of our politicians? Frustrated with the gibberish peddled by our media? Consider this.

It is said that travel broadens the mind. It’s true. There's nothing like wandering around the wonderful old town of Jerusalem whilst tripping over M16 bedecked soldiers at every street corner to bring home to you how tenuous day to day life can be for some; nothing like seeing a small child walking alone along a 5 miles stretch of empty road dwarfed by Andean mountains to make you appreciate the comfort our own cocooned children enjoy on their 4x4 enshrouded school runs; nothing like watching tens of thousands of honey buzzards drifting south over the Caucuses of Batumi, in waves stretching back as far as the eye can see, to make you realise in jaw dropping fashion how marvelous bird migration is....'

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Fri Jul 29, 2016 3:05 pm

New Blog Post concerning the impending departure of swifts:

' The lazy days of high summer are upon us, when in the world of wild creatures something of a lull occurs. No more frantic breeding activity, food is relatively plentiful and everything can take a bit of a breather. But it doesn’t last. Before long there will be sure signs that summer has given way to early autumn. The first and most obvious change will be the departure of our swifts that seem to leave us so suddenly that it takes us by complete surprise. There have been some reasonable sized gatherings of this enigmatic bird locally; I counted about 30 over my garden wheeling together at dusk a few days ago. These flocks include a fair proportion of juvenile birds but sadly represent only a fraction of the large spiralling flocks that could once be observed here. '

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sun Aug 21, 2016 10:26 am

New Blog Post celebrating the wonders of dragonflies at NWT Hickling Broad.

'Away from the brisk westerly breeze sweeping across the swaying mops of fading pink hemp agrimony, apart from the rustling of thousands of swaying reed stems, we found a sheltered spot in the lee of gnarled and twisted birch. Here was the domain of the dragonfly. Atop every dead stem a common darter perched, its multi-faceted eyes scanning the area around its chosen observation point for potential prey or a mate. We watched these four winged predators as they sparred, hunted and courted, arrowing through the warm August air on their short-lived mission to foster another generation. We were quite mesmerised by these jewels of the insect world; wings glistening, backlit against the burning sun of high summer. With the aid of binoculars every minute hair on the dragonflies legs could be seen, every vein on the paper thin wings, every hexagonal lens of their bulbous, rich brown compound eye. The challenge of course was to photograph these sparkling miracles of nature and do justice to their form; an impossible task really, but we felt compelled to try and capture something of their ethereal beauty and record the moment.'

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sun Sep 11, 2016 4:48 pm

New Blog Post. Something a little different for the summer :D

'All on a Summer’s Day

A light rain falls as a misty veil, so let us stay and talk.
Poor a coffee, play some songs, when clear we'll start our walk.
The intimacy of this place, in comfortably familiar guise
Seems dampened in the sultry heat of a summer's late reprise.

Once dry we leave the car to stroll familiar paths;
Through lush green woodland my friend and I look and smile and laugh.
Wonders of nature all around, dragonflies that jink and jive.
On such a day, in such a time, it's good to be alive.....

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com Hope you enjoy it. I would be delighted to hear what you think.
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sat Sep 24, 2016 6:25 pm

New Blog Post giving thanks for a wonderful summer...

'There was a distinct tang of autumn as I approached Reception at Strumpshaw Fen, a taste of change. The air was cool on my face, a light mist shrouding the broad, the various quacks, trills and squawks of the wildfowl unnaturally loud, echoing across the still water. The season was undoubtedly transitioning. But there perched on the depth marker was a kingfisher, halcyon bird. Electric blue, rust orange, dagger bill; alert, watchful, beautiful. I managed to take a few photographs before in the blink of an eye it was gone, whirring arrow straight across the broad to a fresh fishing spot. ...'

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:52 pm

New blog posts about our trip to the Pantanal. Read and enjoy at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Mon Dec 05, 2016 11:15 am

Catch up with a series of blogs tracking our travels around South America...

Read all about it at http://www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Sun Dec 11, 2016 12:40 am

New blog post continuing our journey through South America......

........El Calafate, a pleasant enough medium sized town in Argentine Patagonia, is named after a berberis. This plant is profound hereabouts and the berries are used for making liquor, for putting in pies or simply for eating (don't try this at home folks). Another pinprick in the romanticism of my imagination. I expected the name of this lakeside town in the deep South of Argentina to mean 'The Gateway to Heaven' or something. Instead it is named after a small shrub. We find ourselves here for a couple of days having been driven for 6 hours or so from our last base in Chilean Patagonia. The drive was uneventful, along long straight roads, except for a frustrating wait at the border stuck behind a coach load of Chinese tourists. Here we queued for the best part of an hour whilst some bored national guardsman decided whether or not to stamp our passport. Petty officialdom drives you mad at times. It wouldn't have been so bad had he not stopped what he was doing every couple of minutes to chat to his mates. South America!

We played tag with this particular bus full of orientals on the long drive across the empty, harsh, wind-blasted steppe. We overtake them and stop for coffee/toilets, they pass us and we find ourselves behind them again. We arrive at our hotel and guess who arrives a few minutes later. Good fun. The landscape all around though is very barren. Ranches, or Estanchias, are huge; they have to be. There is simply nothing to sustain sheep or cattle unless you have a lot of land over which they can roam looking to eke a few calories from stunted grasses. Now and again water, in the form of a narrow river, will create an oasis of green and suddenly the landscape is transformed. But only for a few kilometres; it soon reverts to barren wilderness. Ancient glaciers have carved this land, gouging out huge valleys and escarpments, leaving behind hundreds of miles of bare rock, boulders and gravel. The thin layer of soil accumulated over millenia struggles to support life. We saw very little.

However it was to a glacier, a real active one, that we were taken yesterday. The Perito Moreno Glacier to be exact, an hours drive along the blue lake Argentina, Lago Argentino, that is formed by the melting ice that falls from the glacier's face. It is an awesomely impressive natural monument, forming the focal point of a National Park of wooded alpine slopes and meadows that are able to flourish due to the sheltered nature of the valleys and the abundant rainfall. No rain today though. A boat, uncannily full of Chinese tourists.......,.no can't be, takes you within 300 metres of the north face ( it cannot get closer for reasons of safety) where you can look in astonishment at the wall of ice towering 70 metres above you. The glacier itself is some 5 kilometres wide, a fact difficult to grasp when all you can see is a wash of white. There is nothing to give it scale until what looks like a small snowball breaks away from the face. It takes a second for the sound, a loud sharp crack, to reach you and then for the boom as the boulder of ice, not a snowball after all but a mass probably weighing tonnes, splashes into the lake. Snap, snap, snap but the pictures struggle to convey the sense of magnificence.

After the boat trip, that weaves between ice bergs of wonderful smooth shape and electric blue radiance, we were taken to an area that overlooks the glacier's both North and South faces. Here some stunning views are to be had looking back along the snaking river of slowly moving ice into the heart of the Andes themselves. The ice moves at the rate of 1.5 metres a day and is always disintegrating as it funnels into the narrow channel at the mouth of the lake. The accumulated ice we were looking at fell, as snow, between 400 and 900 years ago. These kind of facts numb the mind. To think the chunks of ice we were watching plunge into the near freezing water were laid down possibly at the time Norwich Cathedral was being built; it has taken all that time to slowly, but grindingly surely, reach the end of its journey. You can only stand and stare.

Every few years the press of ice, forming a chevron, blocks the flow of water in the lake. When this happens a huge bridge forms which eventually collapses under its own weight. That sight must be quite something; the noise can apparently be heard 50 kilometres away. I believe it. We were lucky to witness one or two sizeable collapses ourselves and the noise is truly frightening. The raw power of nature is something man can never really conquer. That was yesterday. Today we fly to Buenos Aires..........

Read the full blog at http://www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Attachments
image.jpg
image.jpg (609.25 KiB) Viewed 1629 times
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

Re: Norfolk Wildlife

Postby Easternbushchat » Fri Jan 20, 2017 5:01 pm

Concluding blog post from South America...

'Let's sit here you and me and let the breeze of a summer afternoon wash over us, bringing with it the heady scent of jasmine, the rustling of leaf burdened trees that toss and sway hither and thither, the soporific cooing of pigeons and the droning of winged insects. Billowing puffs of white clouds are pushed across an azure sky and the resident dogs flop resignedly onto the cool tiled terrace waiting for the heat of the afternoon to abate. It's hard to keep your eyes open. This could be England on an idyllic July day, the landscape is familiar enough, but we are instead in the pampas lands of Argentina; the treeless plains, where the song of blackbirds, chaffinches and thrushes gives way to kiskadees, ovenbirds and the piercing screeching of parakeets....'

Read the full post at www.easternbushchat.blogspot.com
Easternbushchat
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 10:03 am

PreviousNext

Return to Local Patch Reporters

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest

cron