Notes from the Wild Wood

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Notes from the Wild Wood

Postby Tiffany Imogen » Mon Dec 15, 2014 12:07 pm

Hello everyone! I'm a wildlife artist and aspiring nature writer currently studying for my MA in English, and my blog features snippets of writing accompanied by pencil, pastel and watercolour illustrations. Living between London and Hampshire, my wildlife sightings tend to be based around the south east; however, when asked I declare my 'local patch' to be the ancient woodland where I volunteer with the London Wildlife Trust, known as Sydenham Hill Wood in south London.

My first piece was about the beautiful RSPB reserve Rainham Marshes in Purfleet, where I encountered the magnificent wasp spider. Hope you enjoy my ramblings & doodlings!

https://notesfromthewildwood.wordpress. ... am-marshes
Tiffany Imogen
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2014 11:28 am

Re: Notes from the Wild Wood

Postby Ben Hoare » Mon Dec 15, 2014 5:11 pm

Wasp spiders are awesome! Also like the way you write about weeds like bindweed - let's hear it for ragwort. Drives me nuts, the way people lose their rag over ragwort.

Confess I never got round to visiting Sydenham Woods, despite living in London for a good 12 years. But it's on the must-visit list. BTW did you see they got a brief mention in our November issue?

Ben
Ben Hoare
Features Editor, BBC Wildlife Magazine, @WildlifeMag
Ben Hoare
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:44 pm
Location: Bristol

Re: Notes from the Wild Wood

Postby Tiffany Imogen » Sat Dec 20, 2014 1:06 am

Thank you! Yes you should definitely visit - it's really magical! And I did indeed see it in the last issue - we were all very excited about it in our volunteer group! :)
Tiffany Imogen
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2014 11:28 am

Re: Notes from the Wild Wood

Postby Ben Hoare » Tue Dec 23, 2014 3:40 pm

Wasp spiders are not so common in our neck of the woods (Bristol, Somerset) though I *think* they have already reached Wales...

But I wonder if they will expand their range further north and west, following the lead of other invertebrates such as tree bumblebee and Jersey tiger moths? We have both of those now...

Ben
Ben Hoare
Features Editor, BBC Wildlife Magazine, @WildlifeMag
Ben Hoare
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:44 pm
Location: Bristol


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