When is Cities: Nature’s New Wild on TV?

Can humans and wildlife live alongside each other in cities? A new BBC series shows that for many animals, cities are just another habitat to live in.

A wild elephant negotiates a busy highway, Sri Lanka. © BBC/Joana Kruse

Home to more than half of the world’s human population, cities provide a range of challenges to their wild residents. Expanding on the final episode of Planet Earth II, comes a new programme from the BBC.

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Cities: Nature’s New Wild, narrated by David Kaluuya, explores to the co-existence of humans and wildlife in urban areas.

When is Cities: Nature’s New Wild being shown on TV?

There are three episodes in this new BBC series.

The first episode Residents is due to air on Sunday 30 December at 9pm on BBC Two, and the second episode Commuters is due to air on Sunday 6 January at 9pm on BBC Two.

Watch a clip from one of the episodes

What animals and locations are featured in Cities: Nature’s New Wild?

There are a wide range of species featured in this new BBC series, here are a few highlights:

1

Smooth-coated otter – Singapore City, Singapore

Otter family travelling through an underpass in Singapore. © BBC/Bernard Seah
Otter family travelling through an underpass in Singapore. © BBC/Bernard Seah

There are more than 600 miles of canals and waterways criss-crossing Singapore City, and one of the most adorable species seen swimming around is the smooth-coated otter.

Otters of the world

Did you know that there are 13 extant (living) species of otter around the globe? The largest is the giant otter, which can grow to 2m in length!

Meet the adorable members of this mustelid family.

A giant otter in Mato Grosso (Brazil). © Sergio Pitamitz/Getty

2

Long tailed macaque – Lopburi, Thailand

Long tailed macaque against Grafitti in Lopburi City, Thailand. © BBC/Stuart Dunn
Long tailed macaque against Grafitti in Lopburi City, Thailand. © BBC/Stuart Dunn

These macaques are smart city dwellers, knowing how to handle the traffic and how to take what they need from their human neighbours.

3

African penguin – Cape Town, South Africa

A waddle of African penguins take their lives in their hands during rush hour in Cape Town, South Africa. © BBC/Alex Lanchester
A waddle of African penguins take their lives in their hands during rush hour in Cape Town, South Africa. © BBC/Alex Lanchester

African penguins can be found nesting in the city gardens of Cape Town, and must safely navigate the route between their home and fishing grounds.

Fascinating facts about penguins

Although we usually associate penguins with Antarctica, the 18 species of continent can be found in range of countries across the southern hemisphere. In fact, the Galapagos penguin can occasionally be found in the northern hemisphere!

Discover more facts about these amazing birds.

Galapagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) standing on rocks, Bartolome island, Galapagos National Park, Ecuador. It is the only penguin that lives north of the equator in the wild.

4

Alligator – Kiawah Island, USA

An alligator and golfer share the fairway on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, USA. © BBC/Mark Wheeler
An alligator and golfer share the fairway on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, USA. © BBC/Mark Wheeler

Along the east coast of the USA, golf resorts are often built on prime alligator habitats. Male alligators guard their territory and females, leaving the young male alligators to explore the fairways and ponds for those which are unclaimed.

5

Manatee – Crystal River, USA

Manatee in crystal clear waters surrounded by snorkellers, Florida. © BBC/David Schrichte
Manatee in crystal clear waters surrounded by snorkellers, Florida. © BBC/David Schrichte
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Manatees, also known as sea cows, can grow up to 4m long and swim to Crystal River for the thermal springs.