When is Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers on TV?

The latest Natural World programme exposes the shocking secrets of the illegal tiger trade in south east Asia, and those who profit from it.

Close up of a caged tiger. © Laura Warner/Grain Media Ltd

When is Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers on TV?

The programme will air on Wednesday 4 March at 9pm on BBC Two.

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Tigers at Kings Romans complex in Laos.
Tigers at Kings Romans complex in Laos. © EIA & ENV

What is Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers about?

Aldo Kane takes a journey along the key trafficking routes in South East Asia, uncovering the shocking secrets of tiger farms and the consumer demand that fuels poaching of wild tigers.

“Anyone with an interest in conservation should watch this film – it is an investigation into the destruction and extinction of an apex predator, an insight into how the commodification of a farmed product can affect an entire wild species,” says Aldo.

Poaching of tigers is hidden out of sight, behind the ivory and rhino trade, this show exposes the reality of tiger farming and the cruelty that many tigers are facing, and the increasing demand for illegal products, such as tiger bone wine and glue.

A captive tiger in Gulin, China.
Captive tigers in Gulin, China. © EIA & ENV

Who is presenting Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers?

Aldo Kane is a former Royal Marines commando who has spent a vast amount of time in the jungles of South East Asia.

Aldo Kane with caged tiger in Sri Racha Zoo, Chon Buri Province Aldo Kane.
Aldo Kane with caged tiger in Sri Racha Zoo, Chon Buri Province Aldo Kane. © Joanna Prichard/Grain Media Ltd

He has been working with charities that have allowed him to play a key part in the conservation and prevention of wildlife crimes.

When the idea of this show came into motion the chance to tell the story of a majestic species facing extinction combined with some risk taking, seemed like the perfect project to Aldo Kane.

“Since I first joined the Royal Marines at the age of 16 I have spent many years travelling the globe and I have also spent a huge amount of time in the jungles of South East Asia. I still remember the exhilarating feeling of sharing the dense forest with the wild tiger, for me the most majestic apex predator. Since then, I have been fascinated by these beautiful creatures and acutely aware of their plight as an endangered species.”

Aldo Kane and Anti Poaching Unit in Taman Negara National Park in Malaysia.
Aldo Kane and Anti Poaching Unit in Taman Negara National Park in Malaysia. © Joanna Prichard/Grain Media Ltd

Watch some clips from Tigers: Hunting the Traffickers:


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Main image: Close up of a caged tiger. © Laura Warner/Grain Media Ltd