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How to make wild cherry lollies

Wild cherries can be used to make many tasty foods. Horticulturist David Hamilton shares his recipe for making summer lollies.

Published: August 14, 2019 at 5:53 pm
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Wild cherry, Prinus avium, is a common tree with white blossom and round dark red fruit. It is found in many areas of Europe as well as parts of the US and Canada.

The cherries grow on clusters on stalks and fruits are usually ripe for picking from the middle of July. They can be used to make all sorts of tasty treats including, pies and jams.

Cherry lollies. © Jason Ingram

When picking cherries make sure you get the right species as other wild cherries make fruit which can taste very bitter or sour. Although if being used for baking the sour variety, Prinus carasus, are best.

Authors

David HamiltonForager, photographer and author

Ingredients

  • 200g Wild cherries
  • 2tbsp Natural yoghurt
  • 1 Banana
  • 2tbsp Fresh orange juice

Method

  • STEP 1

    Blend together the banana and yoghurt in a blender or smoothie maker.

  • STEP 2

    Remove the pits from the cherries and add these to the blender, then slowly add the orange juice and whizz.

  • STEP 3

    Pour the mixture into lolly moulds and freeze for at least three hours. Remove the lollies from the moulds and enjoy! If they are stuck you can run some warm water over them as you remove them.


Dave Hamilton is an author, freelance writer, tutor, photographer, forager and explorer of historic sites and natural places. As a freelance nature writer, he’s contributed to BBC Wildlife, BBC Countryfile, Walk Magazine and the Guardian. He’s authored six books, including Amazon top ten best-seller, Wild Ruins and the comprehensive foraging guide, Where the Wild Things Grow. His books have been translated into five different languages selling over 75,000 copies worldwide. Dave has taught foraging to Ben Fogle and Mary Berry and led Guardian Masterclasses on the subject. In his spare time, he walks, cycles and occasionally performs as a stand-up comic.

David Hamilton

This is a recipe from Family Foraging by David Hamilton, published by White Lion Publishing.

Family Foraging book cover

Main image: jumping jack wraps. © Jason Ingram

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