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How to make tasty wild cherry lollies

Wild cherries can be used to make many tasty foods. Horticulturist David Hamilton shares his recipe for making summer lollies.

Cherry lollies. © Jason Ingram

Wild cherry, Prinus avium, is a common tree with white blossom and round dark red fruit. It is found in many areas of Europe as well as parts of the US and Canada.

Wild cherry tree © DEA/A.LAURENTI/Getty.
Wild cherry tree © DEA/A.LAURENTI/Getty.

The cherries grow on clusters on stalks and fruits are usually ripe for picking from the middle of July. They can be used to make all sorts of tasty treats including, pies and jams.

When picking cherries make sure you get the right species as other wild cherries make fruit which can taste very bitter or sour. Although if being used for baking the sour variety, Prinus carasus, are best.

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Ingredients

  • Wild cherries 200g
  • Natural yoghurt 2tbsp
  • Banana
  • Fresh orange juice 2tbsp

Method

  • Step 1

    Blend together the banana and yoghurt in a blender or smoothie maker.

    Banana slices © Buppha Wuttifery/EyeEm/Getty.
    Banana slices © Buppha Wuttifery/EyeEm/Getty.
  • Step 2

    Remove the pits from the cherries and add these to the blender, then slowly add the orange juice and whizz.

    Wild cherries © Douglas Sacha/Getty.
    Wild cherries © Douglas Sacha/Getty.
  • Step 3

    Pour the mixture into lolly moulds and freeze for at least three hours. Remove the lollies from the moulds and enjoy!

    If they are stuck you can run some warm water over them as you remove them.

    Cherry lollies. © Jason Ingram
    Cherry lollies. © Jason Ingram

David Hamilton is an avid forager, horticulturist and magazine journalist, writing for titles such as the Guardian, BBC Gardener's World, BBC Countryfile and Grow Your Own. He is also the author of numerous books, including the Wild Ruins series of travel books and the Self-Sufficient-ish Bible. He began teaching foraging courses in 2007 after years of experimenting with wild foods.

This is a recipe from Family Foraging, published by White Lion Publishing.

Dave Hamilton

 

Main image: jumping jack wraps. © Jason Ingram

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