How to rear froglets

It’s easy to rear frogs at home – the process takes about three months. Lynn Dicks explains how.

Frog with frogspawn. © Richard Warner/EyeEm/Getty

The common frog is well known for its dramatic metamorphosis from tadpole to adult, but how many children have ever watched this amazing transformation for themselves? Follow our instructions below to raise froglets.

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Common frog © Mike Lane / Getty

1

Prepare the tank

Use a nine-litre plastic tank with a lid, and put washed gravel in the bottom.

Pour water in slowly, over a piece of rock or cardboard. Do not use tap water, because chlorine is toxic to tadpoles. Use rainwater from a water butt or pond water. Tuck some pondweed into the gravel to oxygenate the water. 

2

Collect the spawn

Frogs usually spawn in February or March. Look out for floating clumps of jelly-like spawn in local ponds. Use a net to collect a small amount.

Don’t take too much – you should aim to have three to five tadpoles per litre of water. Gently pull some off by hand if your clump is too big.

3

Float the spawn

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Take the spawn home in a plastic bag of pond water and float the whole thing in your tank.

The tank water will be warmer than the pond and the eggs need to acclimatise gradually. They do not like sudden temperature changes. Keep the tank in a light place but out of direct sunlight. 

4

Watch the young hatching

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After a few hours, tip the spawn out of the bag and into the tank. In this warmer environment, the black dots will quickly turn into commas as the tadpoles hatch.

At first, they have feathery external gills and stay quite still. Once they start swimming, remove the jelly and any undeveloped eggs.

5

Observe the young tadpoles

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The youngsters will graze on algae on the tank and stones. After a couple of weeks, you can give them two or three rabbit pellets or a lettuce leaf (boiled for five minutes and cooled).

Feed every three or four days, waiting until all the food is consumed, otherwise it will make the water cloudy.

6

Replace the water regularly

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Change the water every week. Keep a bucket of fresh water – not tap water, remember – indoors for a few hours beforehand to get the temperature right.

Remove half to three quarters of the water in the tank with a jug, fishing out any escaped tadpoles, then slowly add the fresh water. 

7

Note the changes

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After two months, the tadpoles will be bigger and speckled. When their back legs appear, they become carnivorous. Feed them flakes of fish food or live water fleas from a pet shop.

If you’re using pond water, it may contain small pond creatures – remove predators such as dragonfly and beetle nymphs. 

8

You have froglets!

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Soon, the tadpoles will grow front legs and turn into tiny frogs. Lower the water level and provide a stony beach for them to sit on or they’ll drown because they need to breathe air. When they’re ready to disperse, they’ll climb the walls at night. Release them in damp grass by their native pond.