The Green Planet to premiere at COP26

Due to air globally throughout 2022, the series from BBC Studios Natural History Unit is presented by Sir David Attenborough and will premiere on the eve of the COP26 conference.

David Attenborough. © Sam Barker/BBC

Originally announced in 2019 as a five-part series for 2021, this now six-part series is part of the BBC’s extensive portfolio of coverage around the COP26 conference, which is taking place in Glasgow between 1 to 12 November 2021.

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It will have its premiere on the eve of the conference at COP26’s iMax cinema, before being aired globally in 2022.

The series will be presented by Sir David Attenborough, who said at the time of the original announcement, “This is a wonderful opportunity to explore a neglected yet truly remarkable part of the natural world. Once again, the innovative approach of the BBC Natural History Unit (NHU) and groundbreaking technology will reveal new and surprising wonders to the BBC One audience.”

There is a wide range of other BBC content airing on TV and being created for the BBC websites under the banner of Our Planet Now, include reporting and analysis of the COP26 conference, a four-part series called Life At 50°C, a Climate Voices Festival and World Questions.

“November’s conference provides an opportunity for the BBC to take our commitment to exploring the environment and the challenges facing our planet to the next level,” says Charlotte Moore, BBC chief content officer.

“With the UK hosting the summit, the range of content and the breadth of platforms the BBC can provide means we’re able to illuminate the debate like never before – and help audiences, at home and around the world, understand what’s at stake, the potential for solutions, and how they too can make a difference.”

During October, a number of wildlife programmes are also airing on the BBC, including The Mating Game, The Earthshot Prize: Repairing Our Planet and Restoring The Earth: The Age Of Nature.


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Main image: David Attenborough. © Sam Barker/BBC