Bluebell guide: how to identify the different species, and the top places to see them

Learn about common, Spanish and hybrid bluebells in our guide, including how to identify the different species, and when to see them. Plus, we asked conservation organisations and BBC Wildlife readers for their favourite bluebell locations.

Sunrise over bluebells in Warwickshire. © Ben Waters/Getty

If you are planning to see wildlife, please follow the latest government advice regarding coronavirus, and bear in mind that there are different restrictions in place between England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

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Brilliant purple carpets of bluebells are one of the most stunning spectacles in spring. There are two species of bluebell found in the UK; the native species called the common bluebell (Hyancinthoides non-scripta), and a non-native introduced species called the Spanish bluebell (Hyactinthoides hispanica).

The common bluebell is also known as the English or British bluebell, and sometimes referred to as the native bluebell. In Scotland, it is often called the wild hyacinth and the ‘bluebell’ is actually used for the harebell (Campanula rotundifolia). The common bluebell is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, and must not be picked or uprooted. Care should be taken when going to see bluebells to ensure that they, and other species, are not trampled.

As the name suggests, the Spanish bluebell is native to Spain, and to Portugal. It was introduced as an ornamental plant in British gardens around 1680, and was first recorded in the wild in 1909. It is now considered a naturalised species.

In Scotland, the harebell is known as the bluebell. © FlowerPhotos/Universal Images Group/Getty
In Scotland, the harebell is known as the bluebell. © FlowerPhotos/Universal Images Group/Getty

The genus name Hyancinthoides comes from Greek mythology. Prince Hyacinthus (sometimes Prince Hyacinth) was a Spartan prince and the lover of Apollo. He was accidentally killed when Apollo was teaching him to play quoit. As Apollo cried over the body of his dying lover, his tears (or the blood of Hyacinth himself) created the hyacinth flower, marked with ‘alas’ on its petals.

The two species can be told apart, however they can hybridise and the hybrid (Hyancinthoides x massartiana [hispanica x non-scripta]) can have features from both, making identification tricky. The hybrid is also known as the garden bluebell, and was first recorded in the wild in 1963.

Both the Spanish and the hybrid bluebell are more vigorous than the native species (meaning that they outcompete the common bluebell for resources such as light and space), and conservationists are worried that continued hybridisation may mean we lose the unique characteristics of the common bluebell. A study by Plantlife found that one in six broadleaved woodlands contained the hybrid and/or the Spanish bluebell.

Where are bluebells found?

Common bluebells can be found from northwest Spain and through to the Netherlands in continental Europe. It is thought that the British Isles may have half of the species’ global population.

Bluebell flowers growing on the forest floor in the Hallerbos Beech tree forest near Brussels in Belgium. © Sjo/Getty
Bluebell flowers growing on the forest floor in the Hallerbos Beech tree forest near Brussels in Belgium. © Sjo/Getty

Common bluebells are typically associated with ancient deciduous woodlands (continuous tree cover since at least 1600 in England and Wales, 1750 in Scotland), and other ancient woodland indicator flowers include wood anemone, wood sorrel and ransoms. These are species that typically spread slowly, and usually require long-term and stable woodland cover to survive. Bluebells can spread via seed, but their bulbs can also split to form clones.

However, common bluebells can be found elsewhere if the soil is damp and rich – including hedges, open hillsides, sea cliffs, and even some islands, such as Skomer. They can be planted in gardens, if you are planning to do so, check that a) the bulbs you are being sold do actually belong to the common bluebell species and not the hybrid or Spanish species, and b) that the commercial grower has a licence to source and grow common bluebells from the UK.

Hybrid and Spanish bluebells can be found in gardens, woodlands, churchyards, and rough ground. If you are removing hybrid or Spanish bluebells from your garden or land (remember that it’s only legal to dig up wild plants on your own land), it’s best to dispose of cuttings and bulbs carefully. Composting bulbs before they are dead can lead them to propagate.

When do bluebells bloom?

The common bluebell flowers in April and May. By flowering early in spring, it is able to take advantage of the spring sunlight filtering down to the woodland floor, before the canopy above becomes too dense. According to data from the Nature’s Calendar survey, the first flowering of bluebells has advanced by at least 17 days since 2001.

How to tell the difference between common and Spanish bluebells

There are a number of key identification features to look out for when trying to identify bluebells: colour of the petals and of the pollen, shape of the inflorescence (the flowers and top of the stem), and of the flowers, and presence or absence of scent.

However, as mentioned in the introduction, it’s worth remembering that the two species can hybridise and hybrids can have features from both species.

Identifying the common bluebell (Hyancinthoides non-scripta)

Common bluebell with violet-blue flowers and reflexed petals, and drooping stem, at Foxley Wood NNR, Norfolk, UK. Norfolk Wildlife Trust Reserve, Norfolk. © David Tipling/Universal Images Group/Getty
Common bluebell with violet-blue flowers and reflexed petals, and drooping stem, at Foxley Wood NNR, Norfolk, UK. Norfolk Wildlife Trust Reserve, Norfolk. © David Tipling/Universal Images Group/Getty
  • Petal colour: deep violet-blue
  • Pollen colour: cream
  • Shape of inflorescence: flowers and stem droop or nod, with flowers all on one side
  • Shape of flowers: flowers appear tubular, and the tips of the petals are reflexed (curved back)
  • Scent: strong, sweet scent

Identifying the Spanish bluebell (Hyancinthoides hispanica)

A Spanish bluebell with pale blue flowers with minimal reflexation on the petals (compared to the common bluebell), and an upright stem, growing in England. © Tim Graham/Getty
A Spanish bluebell with pale blue flowers with minimal reflexation on the petals (compared to the common bluebell), and an upright stem, growing in England. © Tim Graham/Getty
  • Petal colour: varied colours including pale blue, white, and pink
  • Pollen colour: blue or green
  • Shape of inflorescence: erect, without drooping, with flowers not restricted to one side
  • Shape of flowers: flowers are more saucer-shaped than tubular, and the tips of the petals are not so reflexed (curved back)
  • Scent: very little or no scent

Does any wildlife feed on bluebells?

Bluebell flowers are attractive to pollinating insects, including butterflies and bees. The bulbs can be eaten by wild boar, which are omnivorous and are known to eat roughly 400 different species of plants and animals. There have been limited studies to the relationship between bluebells and the rooting of wild boar.

A bumblebee feeding on a bluebell. © Andrew Graham/Getty
A bumblebee feeding on a bluebell. © Andrew Graham/Getty
A male orange-tip butterfly clings to an bedraggled common bluebell. © Alec Owen Evans/Getty
A male orange-tip butterfly clings to an bedraggled common bluebell. © Alec Owen Evans/Getty

Where to see bluebells in the UK (suggested by conservation organisations)

Top Forestry England sites for bluebells:

West Woods, Lockeridge (Wiltshire)

A carpet of bluebells in West Woods. © Forestry England
A carpet of bluebells in West Woods. © Forestry England

West Woods is one of the country’s finest locations for bluebells and, with over 500 hectares to explore, you’ll find peace and quiet in this magical corner of Wiltshire.

Westonbirt Arboretum (Gloucestershire)

Bluebells in mixed broadleaved woodland at Westonbirt. © Forestry England
Bluebells in mixed broadleaved woodland at Westonbirt. © Forestry England

The national arboretum offers visitors a beautiful display of bluebells, which creates a spectacular vibrant display alongside other wildflowers and diverse tree species.

Grizedale Forest, Lake District

Oak wood and bluebells in Grizedale. © Forestry England
Oak wood and bluebells in Grizedale. © Forestry England

Parts of this idyllic woodland in the heart of the Lake District are transformed in the spring with a sea of bluebells covering the forest floor.

Top National Trust sites for bluebells:

Godolophin, Helston (Cornwall)

A 16th century garden famed for its sea of native bluebells in the woodland, where years of mining have left an unnatural, undulating landscape.

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Bluebells at Godolphin © Andrew Butler/National Trust Images

Sheffield Park and Garden, Uckfield (East Sussex)

A newly opened part of the woodland area at Sheffield Park contains swathes of undisturbed and thriving bluebells. The River Ouse runs through the bottom of the parkland.

Calke Abbey, Ticknall (Derbyshire)

A short spring walk through the woodland shows off the best of Calke Abbey’s bluebealls. The parkland is also home to Calke’s deer herd consisting of around eighty fallow deer and thirty red, which give birth to their calves during May and June.

Top National Trust for Scotland sites for bluebells

Greenbank Garden, Clarkston (Glasgow)

Greenbank Garden. © NTS
Greenbank Garden. © NTS

An urban oasis close to Glasgow’s Southside suburbs, with woodland walks and beautiful plants in all seasons – don’t miss the bluebells in spring!

Threave Garden and Estate, Castle Douglas (Dumfries & Galloway)

Threave bluebells. © NTS
Threave bluebells. © NTS

A garden for all seasons and a haven for wildlife. The garden is divided into a series of smaller gardens to showcase different styles, including a rose garden, rockery and walled garden. New for 2019, is the Garden of Contemplation.

Culzean Castle and Country Park, near Maybole (Ayshire)

Culzean Castle. © NTS
Culzean Castle. © NTS

Robert Adam’s cliff-top masterpiece rises above a world of, beaches, secret follies and woodland – the floors of which are covered in a sea of blue in spring.

Top RSPB sites for bluebells

The Lodge, Sandy (Bedfordshire)

Bluebells at The Lodge. © Mark Brandon
Bluebells at The Lodge. © Mark Brandon

The headquarters of the RSPB includes woodland, heathland, formal gardens and Iron Age archaeology. There is a wide variety of wildlife to look out for alongside bluebells, including breeding hobby from late April, natterjacks will start croaking in the evenings, and green tiger beetles on the heathland areas.

The Wood of Cree, near Newton Stewart (Dumfries and Galloway)

A fabulous display of bluebells and other woodland flowers during spring. Other star species include red squirrel, pied flycatcher, redstart and even a rare species of bat, Leisler’s bat.

Bluebells at The Wood of Cree © Andy Hay
Bluebells at The Wood of Cree. © Andy Hay

Northward Hill, Cooling (Kent)

This reserve has carpets of bluebells from mid April, whilst whitethroats and nightingales sing from the undergrowth. There are nesting grey herons, little egrets and avocets.

Top Wildlife Trusts sites for bluebells

Launde Woods, (Leicestershire)

Bluebells at Launde Wood. © Andy Lear
Bluebells at Launde Wood. © Andy Lear

The ground flora of this woodland is very rich and includes wood anemone, bluebell, wood-forget-me-not and a variety of orchids such as early-purple, bird’s-nest and greater butterfly.

Pound Wood, Benfleet (Essex)

Bluebells at Pound Wood. © Essex Wildlife Trust
Bluebells at Pound Wood. © Essex Wildlife Trust

In the spring there is a fantastic display of bluebells and visitors can also see common cow-wheat, yellow archangel and wood spurge. Coppicing has opened up wide areas of space where the rare heath fritillary butterfly flourishes.

Siccaridge Woods, Frome Valley (Gloucestershire)

Bluebells in Siccaridge Woods. © Emma Bradshaw/Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust
Bluebells in Siccaridge Woods. © Emma Bradshaw/Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust

An ancient coppiced woodland that boasts carpets of bluebells in spring, and there is a glade noted for its lily-of-the-valley. Other uncommon species found here include herb Paris and bird’s nest orchid.

Top Woodland Trust sites for bluebells

Coed Cefn, Crickhowell (Wales)

Alongside a canopy of oack and beech, this ancient woodland site includes an Iron Age hilltop fort to incorporate a historical angle to your woodland enjoyment.

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Bluebells in Coed Cefn © Woodland Trust

Nidd Gorge, Harrogate (Yorkshire)

Clinging to the sides of a dramatic ravine, Nidd Gorge woodland has a patchwork of habitats supporting a range of wildlife. There is also an adventure trail to keep kids occupied for hours too.

Urquhart Bay, Drumnadrochit (Scotland)

On the banks of the Loch Ness, Urquhart Bay is one of the best examples of surviving ancient wet woodland in Europe. Footpaths form a figure of eight through the centre of the wood.


Where to see bluebells: suggestions from BBC Wildlife readers

  • Ashridgesuggested by Joyce Dela Paz
  • Bradbury Hillsuggested by Roger Parker
  • Darroch Wood – suggested by Kate Fleming
  • Inversnaidsuggested by John Tweedie
  • Kings Wood (Bawtry) – suggested by Sarah Blake
  • The Leasowessuggested by Jo Isaac T
  • Malvern Hills suggested by Emily Vern
  • Moor Copsesuggested by Mike Kirby
  • Morvern – suggested by Ernie Scales
  • Slindon Woods – suggested by Katie White
  • Sulham Woods – suggested by Michael Scott
  • Walsingham Abbeysuggested by Caro McAdam
  • Weston Prink (Coyney Woods)suggested by Colin Osborne
  • West Woods – suggested by Stacey Woolhouse
  • Ynys-hirsuggested by Dave J Dickenson

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Main image: Sunrise over bluebells in Warwickshire. © Ben Waters/Getty